A Review of the Olight I3E EOS

Just for the record, I do not own the featured image.  I must give credit where credit is due and I downloaded it from Google Shopping.

Money was tight for me during the month of December 2019.

Usually each month I am able to get something for myself.

However, money was so tight that I wasn’t able to.

But, for a Cyber Monday 2019 deal, I was able to get an Olight I3E EOS keychain flashlight for next to nothing.

The flashlight was free, but I still had to pay $5.00 for shipping. So I did.

Cyber Monday was December 2, 2019.

My disability pension is paid on the 3rd of every month, but somehow I get my money on the 2nd at 10:00 PM local time.

The deal ended at 11:00 PM and I was actually nervous that supplies would run out.

I monitored all day on Cyber Monday, then when 10:00 PM rolled around I checked my account and the money was in.

Happily, I paid the $5.00 for shipping on Olight’s Store website and the next day my order was processed.

Then I paid the other bills that I could and went to bed.

My flashlight was delivered a few days later and it has been carried in my EDC backpack ever since.

I first saw one of these in person a few months prior to this at my Aunt’s house. Her daughter, my first cousin, had one on her key-chain that her husband got as a gift when he purchased some hunting supplies.

Now, I am very accustomed to seeing high end Chinese flashlights like NiteCore, Klarus, and of course, Olight.

However just about everyone around me usually purchases flashlights at brick and mortar establishments, especially my family members, so I was very shocked to see my cousin in possession of a flashlight made by Olight. Her Dad actually gave me my first flashlight some 31 years ago almost to the date.

I tried hers out and was thoroughly impressed by the brightness. I was secretly wanting one but had no plan to purchase.

Actually, since June of 2019, I had been EDCing a Klarus MI6 on my keys. I definitely should write a review about my Klarus MI6 too one day, but I’ll admit the Olight I3E EOS is much sexier. They are definitely in the same class of flashlights and one was possibly the answer to the other.

This light is definitely powerful, especially for its minimal size.

I think it could be a hit with school children who want to attach it to the zippers on their backpacks.

Let’s teach children that flashlights are cool (which they indeed are cool and I don’t care who you are!)

Besides, when I was a kid I was harassed for liking flashlights and that did a good bit of damage to me mentally, of which I still haven’t fully recovered and I’m 32 about to be 33.

…Enough about that…

According to website specs, the Olight I3E EOS has the following:
a Beam Distance of 144 Feet.
a Light Output of 90 Lumens.
a Power Source of 1 AAA Alkaline or NiMH Battery.
a Beam Intensity of 500 Candlepower
a Run Time of 45 Minutes on an Alkaline Battery or 1 Hour and 10 Minutes on a NiMH Battery
a Waterproof Rating of IPX8.
a Weight or 0.68 Ounces or 19.4 Grams.
a Length of 2.38 Inches or 60.5 Millimeters
a Philips Luxeon TX LED Light Engine.

The flashlight is operated by turning the head to switch on or off. The head also is what keeps the battery in. The key ring attaches to the tail which is a permanent and continuous part of the flashlight body. THIS is a genius and very necessary design!

Most key chain flashlights have a tail cap to access the battery and keep it in place, but this is a fatal error when the key ring attaches to the tail cap:

When attached to keys or even just a lanyard the constant motion unscrews the tail-cap and the body of the flashlight falls off and is lost to only God knows where.

And equally only God knows how many Maglite Solitaires and similarly designed flashlights have suffered this very fate!

Now while this flashlight is indeed powerful for its size, I think some run time was sacrificed for light output.

As stated before, the user only gets 45 Minutes of use with an Alkaline Battery but a very bright 90 Lumens.

However, this flashlights is for brief lighting for nightly situational awareness or locating a lost item that fell into a dark spot. This is not for any tactical situation or much less a search and rescue mission.

I still think 90 Lumens is overkill, especially since so much run time was highly sacrificed.

Maybe it could have been bumped down to 50 or 60 Lumens with a run time extended to 1.5 to 2 hours, but then there wouldn’t be such a “Wow!” factor when the light is turned on. Maybe just a few years ago there could have been, but not in 2019.

My other complaint is: Exactly how secure is the head and LED lamp module on this flashlight? It seems to turn much too easily which could lead to accidental activation or worse a misplaced head. I think it should have been machined with much tighter threading, but that’s just me.

I could be wrong, of course. I mean it moves around in the pouch of my EDC backpack a durn good bit and has yet to have an accidental activation.

But this still makes a great EDC item, but shouldn’t be the main EDC item.

It would indeed make a great gift, especially for bae!

It could also make a gift for a child as I’ve stated before.

Wouldn’t it be awesome if class was being taught and the power went out but all the students turned on their flashlights that they were carrying?

…I know I’m being a dreamer…

I don’t have anything else to say, so this therefore concludes my review of the Olight I3E EOS.

All in all, I give this product a 4.65 out of 5 stars.

I hope you, the reader, have been informed and entertained…

Back to “Product Reviews”

A Review of the Bushnell TRKR T750L Multi Use Flashlight

Just for the record, I do not own the featured image on this page. I downloaded it from Wal Mart’s website.

I have been a fan of Bushnell flashlights since the late Spring of 2014 when I saw them selling at Wal Mart.

By the way, every time I go to Wal Mart, I always check out the flashlights section.

In November of 2014, in fact on Black Friday, I purchased the Bushnell T125L, which I sold in late 2018. I was so impressed by it, that a few days later, I purchased the Bushnell T225L, which I still have. Then in March of 2015, I purchased a Bushnell Pro 100L, also of which I still have. These three have since been updated by Bushnell with brighter LED engines.

Since I always check out the flashlights at Wal Mart every time I shop there, I had long wanted the Bushnell T750L. However, with me being on a fixed income, I cannot frequently fork over almost $40 ($32.44+tax) for a flashlight, no matter how cool it may be.

So I scraped some cash here and there and then finally on December 26, 2019, I went to my local Wal Mart and purchased a Bushnell T750L, which is what this review will be about.

This review will be more of less of my initial reactions, since I have maybe owned it for a little over twenty four hours.

I know this flashlight is mainly targeted towards hunters and I don’t hunt simply because I cannot afford to.  I would love to go hunting but there is so much red tape entailed in being allowed to do so.  Then there is all the required equipment which can go into the tens of thousands of dollars.  If I could afford to hunt, I definitely would, because I would like being able to have a lot of good, healthy meat and to bless others with it as well.  And not only that, I find shooting guns to be very therapeutic!

However, I can find other uses for this flashlight and if there is anything I am good at it is finding non-conventional uses for certain products.

There are three lighting systems on this flashlight:

The main White Cree LED that gives off 750 Lumens for 6.5 Hours with a Beam Distance of 280 Meters-Quite possibly my brightest LED flashlight at the moment and used for general purpose illumination.

4 Red LEDs that give off 16 Lumens for 80 Hours but Wal Mart’s website didn’t specify the beam distance-These are designed for any night time activity without disrupting night vision.

4 Off-Blue LEDs that give off 6 Lumens for 93 Hours with a Beam Distance of 7 Meters-These allow hunters to find and follow the blood trails of wounded game at night.

The durable Aircraft Aluminum body is designed to withstand a 1 Meter drop on a hard surface.

The tactically correct switch allows for a momentary on in any mode.

The power source is 6 AA Alkaline batteries, which fit snugly and securely inside and come bundled for free.

I wish the light cycling system could be custom programmed instead of White-Red-Off Blue.

If it were possible, I would have programmed it to Off Blue-Red-White, so night vision would not be adversely affected whilst initially turning the flashlight on.

However, there is an advantage to that setup and it is self defense tactics.

A full 750 Lumen White light could definitely disorient any opponent in total darkness.

Then the size and weight of this flashlight make it the perfect impact weapon, yet it can still be mostly concealed.

This could definitely be a hit with security personnel, especially those employed at truck stops or marine terminals.

If you could get over that bright White light coming first, then this flashlight could also be a hit with nighttime transportation and logistics workers, because the Red LEDs are generous enough with light to see whatever you’re doing, but won’t adversely affect your night vision.

Then of course there are the Off Blue LEDs, which are for following the blood trails of wounded game at night. This is the main selling point of this flashlight with hunters.

I did drop mine on a hard floor by accident, but it still performs flawlessly and doesn’t even have a ding on it!

I might sometimes carry this in my EDC backpack, because it is indeed compact enough.

I will say that there are very few good flashlights still sold at Wal Mart, when just a few years ago there were plenty.

Wal Mart also sells a very limited variety of Maglites as well, way much less than in previous years.

This downward trend began in 2018 and now we are in a death spiral as far as I’m concerned.

There may be hope like there may not be hope.

All in all I give this product a 4.9 out of 5 stars and the tenth of a point is debatable to begin with, because some may find the light cycling system useful while other may find it detrimental. It all depends on the end user.

This therefore concludes of review of the Bushnell TRKR T750L Multi Use Flashlight.

I hope you, the reader, have been informed and entertained…

Back to “Product Reviews”

A Brief Proposal to Improve the Health of Truckers

I wrote the bulk of this yesterday evening (November 8, 2019) while going through some pretty bad back pain…

 

In my early teens, I had wanted very badly to be a long haul truck driver when I grew up.

It would have been a dream job for me.

It would have been a dream job because I was frequently studying and memorizing road maps to the point where my classmates referred to me as a “human GPS”, whenever we went on a field trip. I was just as eager to ride out the routes of which I had memorized on the maps I was studying. Around the age of fourteen, I was beginning to discover my interest in radio communications. I knew for some time that truckers used Citizen’s Band Radios or “CB” to communicate with each other. Around ages sixteen and seventeen my interest in railroads was starting to come back and I was also gaining an interest in marine logistics. Both railroad and marine workers also used their own dedicated radios to communicate with. At age seventeen I just knew I would have some sort of job in the transportation and logistics industries.

But then at seventeen and a half, I suffered a mental breakdown and would have to be medicated for the rest of my life.

These medications automatically disqualify me from all transportation jobs.

I never thought to use my writing as a way to earn money and I have yet to earn a single red cent from writing, by the way.

I eventually earned a diploma in HVAC, which is very hard to do with the medications I took and I also sustained a back injury in 2014, which made everything worse. The best I could possibly do is work at an HVAC or Electrical Supply company if I were to go back to work in the HVAC field.

Here is something I’ve noticed though:
Just about every truck driver I came across wound up on disability anyway.

Usually, it is because they have developed severe back pain, metabolic or cardiovascular diseases.

Truckers get severe back pain from sitting in the same position for hours to days on end. That also causes them to develop metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, because of the lack of physical activity, but also from having an energy-rich but nutrient poor diet due to constantly eating out.

My own back is hurting me as I type this and actually it was the back pain that inspired this piece.

The trucking industry is a very important aspect of the American and global economies, and that its personnel are very much needed to sustain life as we know it.

However, with many truckers ending up on disability before retirement age (and also having a poor quality of life after retirement), this puts a great strain on the already ailing healthcare system. And it will hinder the path to solvency for Social Security. I will go as far as to say that it is a heavy contributor to the already severe opioid crisis.

There is no easy nor comprehensive solution to this issue.

However, there is something, I think, that can reduce the problem at least a little.

What if, there was a national chain of truck stops that offered healthy meals buffet style?

The food offered could be fresh and steamed vegetables, grilled or baked lean meat and seafood, legumes and fresh fruits for both juice drinks and desserts.

No soft drinks, no fried food, no excessive use of salt, not an overabundance of animal fat and no overly sugary desserts would be available, though.

And the one dining could pay a flat rate for all you can eat.

Basically, I am expanding on the idea of Subway.

It could also be a nice place for those on disability who go eat out when they get their pension payments. It could be like a combination of Cracker Barrel, Ryan’s, Shoney’s and The Golden Corral, but with only healthy food comparable to that of Subway, but actual plate entree`s instead of just sandwiches. I myself am disabled due to several mental issues and, guess what: a back injury!  Anyway, I would love to eat at such a place! I know I would probably eat more than my fair share of green beans there though if such a place actually existed.

But then to further help the situation, there could be exercise rooms with gym memberships, possibly paid for on the company dime. This could save the company a lot of money in the long term and would allow for a healthier workforce.

Durn it, my back is killing me!

I hope to further elaborate on this in the near future, at least on my blog…

Back to “Articles I Have Written”

A Review of the Oregon Scientific WR601N Handheld Weather Radio with S.A.M.E.

For the record, I do not own the featured image on this page, rather I downloaded it from eBay and I give credit to whomever credit is due.

As you, the reader, can probably tell, I have an strong interest in Weather Radios.

I first read about a NOAA Weather Radio in the Summer of 1997 at the age of ten and a half whilst reading a hurricane preparedness pamphlet.

I wouldn’t actually own a NOAA Weather Radio until December of 2001 at the age of fourteen going on fifteen.

However, once I owned one, I would be completely fascinated.

My parents thought there was something wrong with me because of it.

Well technically there is something wrong with me, but when I was a teen, I was the only teen I knew of that was interested in radio electronics.

Nowadays, there are plenty of teens who are interested in radio electronics, especially weather radio, and sites like YouTube are living proof.

Sometimes I feel like I was born in the wrong generation and should have been born ten to fifteen years later.

It was in my mid-twenties that I began to collect weather radios.

Now at the age of thirty-two-going-on-thirty-three, I am frequently visiting thrift stores, flea markets, antique shops, and hamfests to purchase gently-used vintage weather radios.

On November 2, 2019, I had some cash on me and went to my local GoodWill.

It was as if God Himself was telling me to go there because I would find a weather radio.

And in the electronics/appliances section, I found an Oregon Scientific WR601N in very good condition, but selling for only $1.97+tax.

I had been wanting one of these for a couple years but didn’t want to pay the MSRP.

This piece will be a review of that aforementioned weather radio.

What I purchased at GoodWill only included the radio, battery door, and lanyard. There was no manual, cradle or AC adaptor.

Still, for $1.97+tax, I’m not going to complain.

Performance-wise, this radio is a true winner:
The size is very compact and can be carried on your person or in a backpack without weighing the user down.

The antenna is short and stubby, but is rugged and pulls in the Weather Radio broadcast very well, even from forty miles away!

The speaker audio is clear and crisp but can be annoying when there is noise in the signal.

The radio runs on 3 AA batteries and the runtime seems generous.

There are a clock and calendar which I must say keeps time very accurately, like +/-1 second in a week!

There are two separate alarm times that can be set and the alarm is loud enough.

The radio receives all seven weather radio channels.

The radio is equipped with S.A.M.E. technology and can store up to six administrative divisions or monitor all six.

The blue backlight lights up the display brightly and evenly. It is activated by pressing the snooze button.

The housing seems to be built very well and could probably survive a few drops.

Also, the face of the radio is yellow, meaning it can be easily found in a dark room or cluttered baggage.

There is an external speaker jack.

The display can be expressed in English, French or Spanish.

There are only three real [albeit minor] complaints I have and they are:
The radio can be a bit tricky to program and operate and takes some getting used to.

The radio also has trouble standing by itself, even on a flat surface.

The radio should have better noise limiting circuitry since it will not work well near any source of electrical noise.

However, at the price I paid, I’m not going to make any case about the complaints.

Even though I didn’t buy it brand new and I don’t have all the right accessories, I have been EDCing this radio for the past week and I am totally satisfied.

While Midland is my favorite brand of Weather Radios, I’ll admit they could learn plenty from this model.

What I like most are the rugged and compact build and clear crisp reception.

It is good to have S.A.M.E., but I could take it or leave it since I would use this for traveling or outdoor activities, where S.A.M.E. isn’t always necessary.

Like other compact portable models, the WR601N would be well suited for an EDC bag, a bug out/bailout bag, or a safe room, all for monitoring the progress of the weather, without needing line current.

I’m really impressed all in all and this is a vast improvement over the Oregon Scientific WR-8000, which actually was the first weather radio I had ever owned.

I give this product a 4.7 out of 5 stars!

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A Review of the Streamlight Stylus Pro® Penlight

Just for the record, I do not own the featured image on this page.  Rather it is the property of Streamlight Inc.

In my late teens, I had first discovered Streamlight flashlights.  I wouldn’t actually own one, a 3C Twin Task®, until the age of twenty-two.  I would later own a Scorpion®.

In March of 2010, at the age of twenty-three, I bought my first Streamlight Stylus Pro® at my local Batteries Plus (now Batteries+Bulbs) in Houma, Louisiana.  It set me back between $24-30 and I did EDC it for at least a little while.  LED technology hadn’t advanced enough in 2010 and this particular version of the Stylus Pro® gave off a measly 24 Lumens for 7.5 hours on 2 AAA batteries.  Still, it was very rugged and bright for its price of the time.  I was working as a grocer and would use it when picking up shopping buggies at night.   It was fun to show off in the nighttime parking lot at work.  I had also used it for roadside emergencies involving now ex-in-laws.  In late 2011, I had given it to a friend and went back to everyday carrying mostly Mini Maglites.

In early April of 2018, I had purchased another one at the Cabela’s in Gonzales, Louisiana, for a price of between $16-20.  The model had definitely advanced.  Brightness was now 90 Lumens, but I only bought it as a cheaper replacement for both of the 2AAA Pro Tac® penlights that I had misplaced.  I EDCed it briefly but ended up selling it in October of 2018.

Since the Summer of 2019, I had been wanting another Stylus Pro®, especially since I enjoy my Streamlight JR® so much.  Also, the brightness went up another 10 Lumens, now at 100 Lumens.  Even though I hated my grocer job, I do romanticize grocery work, probably even more so because I wrote my  “Grocer and Writer” stories.  So in late October of 2019, I ordered a brand new Stylus Pro®.  It came in today, November 7, 2019.  The best part is, I only paid $16.99 for it with free shipping!

According to Streamlight’s Website, these are the specifications on the Stylus Pro®:

 

  • White LED delivers 100 lumens; 62m beam; runs 8 hours; 950 candela-good enough for just about any everyday carry scenario.
  • Push button tail switch – momentary or constant on operation-tactically correct for law enforcement use or for those who know Morse Code.
  • Includes two “AAA” alkaline batteries and tear-resistant nylon holster-quite generous offer.
  • Type II MIL-SPEC abrasion and corrosion-resistant anodized aircraft aluminum construction with unbreakable, scratch-resistant polycarbonate lens-will still look elegant even after long term everyday use. 

Streamlight is telling the truth about these specs, by the way!

In my opinion, the Stylus Pro® was always an awesome flashlight, but even more now since Streamlight regularly updates this product as LED technology improves.

I plan to EDC this flashlight in conjunction with my Streamlight JR®, possibly even side to side in my pocket!

If I ever to grocery work again, this will be my work flashlight, both for picking up buggies at night or working in dark coolers and/or freezers.  And if there was ever a power failure on the job, Lord knows I would light up the warehouse or sales floor.

What strikes me as odd though is that the Stylus Pro® is serialized while the JR® is not.

If an updated version of the Stylus Pro® is ever released, I will [eventually] be buying one.

Why can’t it be made here in America though?

Well if it was, it would probably cost that much more.

All in all, I give this product a 5 out of 5 stars!

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A Review of the SwissGear 3598 City Backpack

For the record, I do not own the featured image on this page. It is property of SwissGear and/or Group III International.

I have been owning and using Wenger then SwissGear backapcks since 2006, mostly for attending trade school.

I have been using them for EDC since 2008.

I have owned five Wenger backpacks purchased from 2006 to 2011 and carried between 2006 and 2015.

I also owned two Victorinox backpacks which I purchased from 2015 to 2016 and carried between 2015 and 2017.

I will say that while Wenger and SwissGear were more affordable and more durable than their Victorinox counterparts.

They are also more available at brick and mortar retailers.

In November of 2017, I purchased a SwissGear backpack, which is the successor to Wenger.

Then on October 10, 2019, I purchased a SwissGear City Backpack Model Number 3598, which this review will be about.

This will be a review of my initial reactions, because I haven’t even owned it for twenty-four hours at the time of writing this.

However, I want to do a backpack review since they are instrumental in the world of EDC and I have been EDCing since the age of seven.

As a child and up to age twenty, I had carried my posessions in an Out Door products duffel bag. I did so until the zipper broke.

When I began trade school at age nineteen, I carried my books and laptop in my first Wenger backpack.

I had other backpacks to get me through trade school which I graduated in 2009.

At some point in trade school, I had realized that a backpack is better than a duffel bag for EDC.

So I used mostly Swiss branded backpack since then, except for a few brief times.

On October 10, 2019, I had some cash on me and was in the market for a new Swiss backpack.

I went to Target where most of them are sold and had a team member check the prices on each one I was interested in.

All were out of my price range of the cash I had on me when taxes factored in and I didn’t want to use my credit cards.

But then I saw the most basic model had a display tag of $39.99 even though it was scanning for $44.99.

I was able to get it sold to me for $39.99 of which I had enough to cover the sales tax without using my credit cards.

God was definitely with me on this.

I left the store and went home to set it up.

My initial reaction to it was that it was more narrow and lighter than what I had previously been using.

It also seemed more rugged.

The engineering on this bag is genius as far as space management goes.

I am able to fit just about everything I was previously carrying, including my computer repair tools, yet it is considerably more compact.

The only device I have yet to find a spot for is my graphing calculator, but I don’t really need to EDC that anyway.

According to SwissGear’s website, the 3598 is, “…an everyday backpack that entails modern functionality for commuters and travelers.”

Also according to SwissGear’s website;

Some of the features this backpack provides are:
-Padded, Airflow back panel with mesh fabric for superior back ventilation and support.
(excellent for everyday carrying outdoors in the Louisiana heat.)

-Padded shoulder straps with breathable mesh fabric and thumb ring adjuster pulls.
(perfect for carriers of different sizes and statures.)

-Front Panel pocket with side zipper for extra storage space.
(ideal medication/medical supplies storage for everyday carriers with special needs.)

-Front organizer panel with divider pockets and compartments for IDs, credit cards, smartphone, travel documents, and other essentials.
(handy when traveling in foreign countries.)

-Spacious main compartment features a padded tablet pocket.
(useful for holding reading/writing materials research or studying while on the go.)

-Mesh water bottle pocket.
(esential to keep the user hydrated whilst on foot.)

-Side accessory pocket.
(this is where I personally store my computer repair tools.)

-Side compression straps to tighten down load.
(genius design secures load better.)

The SwissGear 3598 has the following specifications:

It is made of durable enough Polyester.

The physical dimensions are 18 inches (45.72 cm) tall, 9 inches (22.86 cm) wide and 7 inches (17.78 cm) deep, which make it small enough to take just about anywhere.

The tare weight is 1.5 pounds (0.6804 kg), though depending on the contents it should not weigh the user down too much.

The total storage volume is 15.9 Liters (4.2 US Gallons.), so it should allow the user to take at least the essentials and maybe a little extra.

I know I have only had this for less than a day, but so far I am impressed and pleased!

By the way, if I am not pleased or if it fails, then there is ten year extended warranty.

Right now I give it a five out of five stars, especially because of the space management!

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A Review of the Streamlight Pro Tac 2 AAA Tactical Penlight

Just for the record, I do not own the featured image on this page. It is actually the property of Streamlight Inc.

Since my teens, I have been a self-taught computer technician.

I had become considerably proficient at fixing computers in my early twenties and by my thirties, people are frequently coming to me for a repair or at least consulting me for advice.

I guess I can say that I am a computer nerd. And I am proud of it!

However, there are those that want to make trouble with people like me.

And then there are those who just want to make trouble.

There are people like these even in the best of workplaces.

Then there could just be someone off the street who wants to commit a robbery, I mean computer equipment is very valuable and computer repair equipment is also somewhat valuable.

How does one defend oneself against such a belligerent individual?

I mean, they are probably more fit physically and carrying a weapon of any sort is at best heavily regulated and at worst downright illegal.

Meet the tactical flashlight!

Specifically, meet the Streamlight Pro Tac 2 AAA model, which this piece will be a review of.

I have owned three of them, but misplaced two.

I bought my first one in January of 2018, then another in March of 2018 and my current one in March of 2019.

I EDC my current one with the rest of my computer repair tools for self-defense purposes, rather than general or specific illumination.

This neat little flashlight is slightly longer and thicker than an ink pen, meaning it can be tucked away in a backpack or purse and not noticeable until needed.

The Streamlight Pro Tac 2 AAA can be programmed to three different configurations, which is a feature known as “TEN-TAP® Programming.” The three different modes are:

1. high/strobe/low

2. high only

3. low/high

I have kept mine set on the default high/strobe/low configuration (more on why in a bit.)

The LED light engine has somewhat generous specs, at least for its hardware setup:

High Mode features a 130 lumen 70-meter beam, runs for 1.75 hours and has a beam intensity of 1,230 candelas.

Low Mode features a 20 lumen 30-meter beam, runs for 13 hours and has a beam intensity of 230 candelas.

Strobe Mode runs 3.5 hours and is available for signaling help or disorienting an opponent for defensive purposes.

This flashlight is somewhat water-resistant and has a rating of IPX7 which means the unit is waterproof to a depth of 1 meter for 30 minutes.

It is also impact forgiving and was tested to withstand a fall from a height of 2 meters.

It is constructed of a very durable and abrasion-resistant machined aluminum with a Type II Mil-Spec anodized finish.

The openings are O-ring sealed to keep harmful fluids out.

The glass lens is more robust than say a polycarbonate lens.

It is 5.62 inches (14.27 cm) long and weighs 2 ounces (57g) with batteries installed.

So how is this flashlight a potential self-defense instrument?

I will explain:

First off it is made of a hard Aluminum.

Then, the front bezel is scalloped making a semi-sharp striking weapon.

Finally, it features a strobe which can disorient an attacker, especially in darkness.

The idea is one knows he or she will near any trouble makers to have this flashlight in a place where it can be quickly deployed.

Then if confronted by a violent or threatening individual, especially in the dark, the idea is to activate the strobe, which is done by two quick presses of the switch and shine it in the opponent’s eyes. As the opponent shields his or her face, the next step is to either run away and get help, or to stike the opponent as hard as you can with the scalloped bezel. Places to hit would be the face, eyes, throat or temple as hard as you can. When the impact is made, push and turn into the point of impact as this will break the skin and cause more pain and therefore more stopping power. There are a few videos on sites like YouTube that can show how to execute these movements with better precision and effectiveness than what I am simply describing on my blog. Yes, this methodology turns a small flashlight into a potentially lethal weapon. The good part is that, while it is not considered a weapon legally, it, therefore,may be carried almost anywhere.

Also for the record, I am not liable for any criminal or legal penalties you, the reader, may incur for using this as a weapon. Take my advice and the advice of others at your own risk.

Unfortunately, we live in a society that punishes people for simply defending themselves, even against armed and dangerous criminals. This is a curse that seems to be falling onto the entire Western World.

However, it is better to be judged by twelve than carried by six.

I would advise using this only if the opponent is wielding a weapon, has battered you first or has demanded your property.

This is meant to be a defensive, not an offensive weapon.

Still, it can be a legal equalizer without the red tape, obligations, and requirements of a concealed carry weapons permit.

My one complaint about this flashlight is the faulty pocket clip.

That design needs to be completely redone, as it was the faulty clip that malfunctioned and caused me to misplace my first two.

I keep my third one in a dedicated compartment of my EDC backpack with my computer repair tools and if I felt the need to carry it, I would not clip it to my pocket but rather store it deep in my pocket.

I wish the LED could also be at least 200 lumens instead of 130, but that I pushing it, I get it.

All in all, I give this product a 4.75 out of 5 stars because of the faulty pocket clip.

If the pocket clip were as robust as its 2 AA sibling, I would give it a full 5.

This, therefore, concludes my review of the Streamlight Pro Tac 2 AAA.

I hope you, the reader, have been informed and entertained…

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